Feb 072016
 
Never see a need without doing something www.precioustreasures.com.au

Never see a need without doing something about it. Mary MacKillop, 1871.

I have been pondering a few quotes from two women with beautiful hearts, who were doers and respected dignity for all. For me, the above quote is a favoured and inspiring one from St. Mary MacKillop. It's a short and simple sentence and yet it says so much. How quick can we be to judge and criticise people for anything at all? How often would we stop to think about whether those we're criticising are in some kind of need?

There's a story of Mary MacKillop, seeing a woman sitting in the gutter went and sat with her. A companion of Mary MacKillop had assumed the woman was drunk but Mary sat in the gutter with the her and discovered that the woman needed help as she was ill. Mary then helped her to a chemist where she could get assistance.

Anything that Mary did she did because she also believed that

God gives me strength for what is necessary.

Here are some beautiful words from another doer - Mother Teresa tells us,

  • God doesn’t require us to succeed, he only requires that you try.
  • Never worry about numbers. Help one person at a time and always start with the person nearest you.
  • If you can’t feed a hundred people, then feed just one.
  • Not all of us can do great things. But we can do small things with great love.

I love the above quotes from Mother Teresa. We may not be able to help everyone at all times but even doing the smallest thing could be the greatest thing we do for someone. It could become quite contagious once we begin.

 

More information on the great Aussie battler and overcomer Mary MacKillop can be found here.

More information on the merciful and compassionate Mother Teresa can be found here.

Feb 032016
 

Bloom where you are planted.

You are where you are for a reason; and if you did not choose to be there or were not meant to be there try to see it as a sidetrack to where you're meant to be - an added experience, a learning of something new in your life, the dawning of an idea or piece of knowledge you never held before, or an opportunity to share your gifts - to help, assist, learn. Wherever we are at any given point in time strive to be the best you can - as a person at work, home or with family, friends, neighbours, acquaintances and strangers.

Bloom where you are planted - it will be for the benefit of many ... and also for you. For wherever you are becomes a step towards where you're meant to be.

Truly charity has no limit; for the love of God has been poured into our hearts by His Spirit dwelling in each one of us, calling us to a life of devotion and inviting us to bloom in the garden where He has planted and directing us to radiate the beauty and spread the fragrance of His Providence.

St. Francis de Sales

Jan 142016
 

precioustreasures.com.au

The Lord entrusts us with his gifts and graces and he gives us freedom to use them as we think best. With each gift and talent, the Lord gives sufficient grace and strength for using them in a fitting way. As the parable of the talents shows (Luke 19: 11-28), God abhors indifference and an attitude that says it's not worth trying. God honors those who use their talents and gifts for doing good. Those who are faithful with even a little are entrusted with more! But those who neglect or squander what God has entrusted to them will lose what they have. There is an important lesson here for us. No one can stand still for long in the Christian life. We either get more or we lose what we have. We either advance towards God or we slip back. Do you trust in God's grace to make good use of the gifts and talents he has given you?

Lord Jesus, be the ruler of my heart and mind and the master of my home and goods. Fill me with a generous and wise spirit that I may use the gifts, talents, time, and resources you give me for your glory and your kingdom.

 

Meditation and prayer reprinted with permission: copyright (c) 2015 Servants of the Word, source:  www.dailyscripture.net, author Don Schwager

Aug 102015
 

The beautiful heart of St. Lawrence can be found in the love and care he gave to the poor and needy, the love he had for Rome - the centre of Christianity and the seat of the Vicar of Christ; and his faithfulness to the church.

St. Lawrence of Rome.

St. Lawrence of Rome. Image Public Domain

St. Lawrence of Rome was martyred in the third century during the persecutions of Emperor Valerian. He was one of the seven deacons in charge of helping the poor and carried the title of archdeacon – a position of great trust that included the care of the treasury and riches of the church and the distribution of alms among the poor. Lawrence was ‘keeper of the church’s treasures’.

During the persecution of Valerian, Pope St. Sixtus II and six deacons were condemned to death. This would leave Lawrence as the ranking Church official in Rome, but Lawrence too would follow in steps of martyrdom four days later.

Statue of St. Lawrence on the colonnade of St. Peters Rome Sculptor - Lazzaro Morelli

Statue of St. Lawrence on the colonnade of St. Peters Rome
Sculptor - Lazzaro Morelli

The Prefect of Rome had ordered Lawrence to bring the Church's treasure to him. Lawrence said he would do this within three days. He worked swiftly to distribute as much Church property to the poor as possible, so as to prevent its being seized by the prefect. He then went through the city of Rome and gathered a multitude of the poor, sick, blind, crippled and suffering – these he presented to the Prefect saying “These are the true treasures of the Church!"

St. Lawrence marble stone.www.precioustreasures.com.au
It was in great anger that the Prefect condemned Lawrence to a slow, cruel death. On the 10th of August, the last of the seven deacons of Rome, suffered a martyr’s death. St. Lawrence was tied to a gridiron placed over a low fire that roasted his flesh slowly.

After the saint had suffered the pain for a long time, he even joked with his torturers, "assum est...versa et manduca" - "This side is done, turn and eat". From this derives his patronage of cooks and chefs, and also of comedians.

Saint Lawrence's feast day is August 10th.
Patron saint of many … several are listed as follows -
• against fire
• archives
• archivists
• brewers
• butchers
• chefs
• comedians
• comediennes
• comics
• confectioners
• cooks
• cutlers
• deacons
• glaziers
• laundry workers
• librarians
• libraries
• paupers
• poor people
• restaurateurs
• schoolchildren
• seminarians
• stained glass workers
• students
• tanners
• vine growers
• vintners
• wine makers
• 36 cities and dioceses, including Rome.
More information can be found on St. Lawrence on the Vatican website.

 

Note: The image of St. Lawrence is a photographic reproduction of a two-dimensional, public domain work of art. This photographic reproduction is also in the public domain. All other images are copyright of Precious Treasures.

Apr 282015
 

WARNING: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander readers are warned that content on this page may contain images and references to deceased persons.

France, C. 1916. Non Commissioned Officers and Gunners who served at Gallipoli. Identified front centre is Indigenous soldier Private Alfred Jackson Coombs.

France, C. 1916. Non Commissioned Officers and Gunners who served at Gallipoli. Identified front centre is Indigenous soldier Private Alfred Jackson Coombs.

Indigenous Australians have served in all major conflicts, from the Boer War to Afghanistan. With the centenary of the Anzacs we remember and commemorate all those who have served in the armed forces. I would like to pay a special tribute to the Indigenous Australians who fought in the wars; including the women who enlisted in women’s services or worked in war industries.

Private Frederick Prentice,12th Battalion, and later 1st Australian Pioneer Battalion. He enlisted on 7 May 1915 in Keswick, SA, and won a Military Medal for his actions on 19 July 1916 at Pozieres, France, where he showed great courage, resource and ability in bringing machine guns and ammunition through the enemy barrage in the dark and across broken ground. Frederick Prentice returned to Australia as a Corporal on 12 May 1919.

Private Frederick Prentice,12th Battalion, and later 1st Australian Pioneer Battalion. He enlisted on 7 May 1915 in Keswick, SA, and won a Military Medal for his actions on 19 July 1916 at Pozieres, France, where he showed great courage, resource and ability in bringing machine guns and ammunition through the enemy barrage in the dark and across broken ground. Frederick Prentice returned to Australia as a Corporal on 12 May 1919.

Private Richard Martin. Originally enlisted in the 15th Battalion on 17 December 1914 and served with this unit at Gallipoli but was transferred to the 47th Battalion. He embarked from Alexandria on 14 June 1916 bound for Marseilles. In three years of fighting on the Western Front he was wounded in action three times. He was killed in action on 28 March 1918.

Private Richard Martin.
Originally enlisted in the 15th Battalion on 17 December 1914 and served with this unit at Gallipoli but was transferred to the 47th Battalion. He embarked from Alexandria on 14 June 1916 bound for Marseilles. In three years of fighting on the Western Front he was wounded in action three times. He was killed in action on 28 March 1918.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

With the First World War Australia saw over 1000 Indigenous Australians serve in the AIF. It was difficult for them to enlist, being rejected due to Australia's Defence Act of 1903 which excluded people who were not substantially of European descent from enlisting. Some managed to slip through and once in they served in the same conditions as other members; many experienced equal treatment for the first time in their lives and were paid the same as other soldiers. But it is sad to note that on return to civilian life many found they were treated with the same prejudice and discrimination as before.

Private Miller Mack, 50th Battalion. He embarked with the 7th Reinforcements from Adelaide on HMAT Afric on 6 November 1916.

Private Miller Mack, 50th Battalion. He
embarked with the 7th Reinforcements from Adelaide on HMAT Afric on 6 November 1916.

Why did Indigenous Australians want to serve? Loyalty and patriotism may have encouraged Indigenous Australians to enlist. Some saw it as a chance to prove themselves the equal of Europeans or to push for better treatment after the war. But this was not to be. After the war, in areas such as education, employment, and civil liberties, Aboriginal ex-servicemen and women faced greater discrimination when they came home than before they left. (Even unable to vote, it wasn’t until 1962 that voting rights were granted to all Aboriginal Australians; although some Aboriginal people were granted voting rights in the 1850s in some states).

Trooper Horace Thomas Dalton, 11th Light Horse Regiment. He enlisted on 16 May 1918, and embarked for service overseas aboard HMAT Port Sydney (A15) from Sydney on 17 August 1918.

Trooper Horace Thomas Dalton, 11th Light Horse Regiment. He enlisted on 16 May 1918, and embarked for service overseas aboard HMAT Port Sydney (A15) from Sydney on 17 August 1918.

Despite the treatment of Indigenous Australians by white Australia, they supported the country's defence. Indigenous Australians are to be remembered and given the same recognition as all those who served (are serving) our country without any separation. They served with courage and sacrifice, placing others before self.

Greater love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.   John 15:13 King James Version (KJV).

The Spirit of ANZAC is a cornerstone which underpins our Australian image, way of life and indeed is an integral part of our heritage.

We will remember them.

The images used in this article are Public Domain referenced from the Australian War Memorial website from the Collections items.

Apr 252015
 

Anzac-Day-2015-Images-3

This year marks 100 years since our nation’s involvement in the First World War. Anzac Day is a special day when we commemorate all those who served in the wars.

This day goes beyond the anniversary of the landing on Gallipoli in 1915. We remember Australians who served and died in all wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations.
Anzac Centennial

The name Anzac stands for Australian and New Zealand Army Corps. The soldiers in those forces quickly became known as Anzacs, and the pride they took in that name endures to this day.
Anzac Day tradition

Ode

They went with songs to the battle, they were young.
Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow.
They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted,
They fell with their faces to the foe.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning,
We will remember them.

The Ode comes from For the Fallen, a poem by the English poet and writer Laurence Binyon and was published in London in the Winnowing Fan; Poems of the Great War in 1914.

anzac-day-concert-20141

Why is this day special to Australians? Read more here.